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Therapist in Taiwan

REMEDY wellbeing Intensive Outpatient Program in Taiwan

Licensed therapist in Taiwan

 

Remedy Wellbeing exists as an oasis of calm in the world of Therapy Services.  A home away from home in an area of outstanding natural Spanish beauty.  A place to get better and recover fully. The REMEDY wellbeing behavioural health specializes in delivering successful professional Luxury Mental Health and Wellness Services. Placing long term recovery and deep integrity at the heart of everything we do.

Specializations | Therapist in Taiwan, Depression & Anxiety Clinic in Taiwan, Sex Addiction, Love Addiction, Drug Rehab in Taiwan, Alcohol Addiction Rehab Center in Taiwan, Trauma Treatment in Taiwan, Substance Abuse Treatment Center Taiwan, Anxiety, Depression, Gambling Life Crisis, Eating Disorder Treatment in Taiwan, Secondary Rehab, Smoking Cessation, Process Addictions, Outpatient Suboxone Clinic in Taiwan.

 

Full Online Program | The REMEDY @ Home is a monthly program with an investment of between USD $45.000 and $75.000 per month

 

The Remedy Wellbeing Signature Program | Designed for maximum flexibility online around the needs of its clients, from USD $18.000 per month

 

Full Residential Concept | REMEDY costs from USD $304,000 per week

 

Tripnotherapy™

Tripnotherapy™ was awarded Overall Winner: Luxury Psychedelic Retreat in 2020, 2021 & 2022 by Worlds Best Rehab Magazine. Exceptional, Expansive Psychedelic Retreats. Therapeutically Led & Medically Managed.

 

Unlike traditional ceremonial retreats, Psychedelic-assisted therapy involves intense therapy alongside the ingestion of a classical psychedelic such as psilocybin, ketamine, or ayahuasca.

 

Tripnotherapy™ by REMEDY is the Worlds finest Luxury Psychedelic Retreat. Guests include highly motivated individuals keen to experience spiritual connection and mental healing.

Price | Luxury Tripnotherapy retreats cost from USD $8000 pp

Therapist in Taiwan

This article contains some helpful tips for finding a therapist in Taiwan

 

It can be very difficult to find the Right therapist in Taiwan. With so many to choose from, each with their own advantages and disadvantages how do you even begin to find a therapist in Taiwan that you’re comfortable with, and who you feel can help change your life for the better.

 

There are many different types of therapist in Taiwan. As a guide the following therapists are available locally in Taiwan:

  • Depression Therapy in Taiwan
  • Anxiety Clinics
  • Divorce Coaches in Taiwan
  • Addiction Counsellors in Taiwan
  • Gambling Addiction Help
  • Eating Disorder Treatment in Taiwan
  • Over 50s Therapy
  • Young Adult and Teenage Therapists in Taiwan
  • Process Addictions Therapy in Taiwan
  • Life coach Taiwan

 

REMEDY wellbeing runs a new Intensive Outpatient program in Taiwan especially for individuals and families suffering from a range of mental health issues including depression, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, gambling, and sex addiction. It’s conveniently located in the center of Taiwan with exceptionally easy access. Because of the nature of the clinic the exact address is confidential, for the protection and confidentiality of patients in the Taiwan area.

 

 

The name — intensive outpatient program — gives a good indication of what it is. While it’s an outpatient program, there is no need to stay in a facility for a prolonged period, it still offers intensive treatment. This means that a client can benefit from the advantages of support without needing to stay in a facility.

 

What to Consider When Choosing a Therapist in Taiwan

 

When deciding on a therapist in Taiwan, there are many factors that go into finding the best fit, including specialty, personality, cost, and scheduling. It’s a big step, and usually those who find counselling in Taiwan ultimately find their life improves because of it. In short, if you feel like you need therapy, or if the question has entered your mind… then you could possibly benefit from some sessions.

 

Questions to ask yourself when looking for a therapist in Taiwan. The more specific you can be in your answers to these question, the better equipped you will be to figure out what you want from your therapist.

  1. Know Your Purpose
  2. Know what you want out of therapy?
  3. What difficulties are you currently experiencing?
  4. How are they affecting you?
  5. Consider your emotions and thoughts as well as the negative impact they’re having on your life.
  6. What do you hope to gain?
  7. What do you hope will be better as a result?
  8. Why do you want to seek mental health therapy?

 

Many times, people just know that things in their life aren’t right but find it hard to describe in words. This is normal and okay. One purpose for therapy is to help you make sense of what you’re experiencing. You don’t have to develop detailed responses to these questions. Just let them guide you in developing a rough goal.

 

Does it feel like a good match?

 

Once you’ve settled on a potential therapist in Taiwan it’s time to assess if they’re a going to be a good personality fit for you. Consider the following:

  • Personalities: A positive connection (but not a friendship) with your therapist is vital.
  • Trust: You should trust your therapist enough to discuss your thoughts and behaviors.
  • Authenticity: A good therapist is honest and genuine.
  • Unconditional positive regard: A therapist worthy of your choice values your progress.
  • Positive communication: Therapists should communicate openly and warmly.
  • Your own preferences : You may want to find a therapist who is familiar with your identity.

Coordinates: 24°N 121°E / 24°N 121°E / 24; 121

Taiwan, officially the Republic of China (ROC),[I] is a country in East Asia, at the junction of the East and South China Seas in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, with the People’s Republic of China (PRC) to the northwest, Japan to the northeast, and the Philippines to the south. The territories controlled by the ROC consist of 168 islands, with a combined area of 36,193 square kilometres (13,974 sq mi). The main island of Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa, has an area of 35,808 square kilometres (13,826 sq mi), with mountain ranges dominating the eastern two-thirds and plains in the western third, where its highly urbanised population is concentrated. The capital, Taipei, forms along with New Taipei City and Keelung the largest metropolitan area of Taiwan. Other major cities include Kaohsiung, Taichung, Tainan, and Taoyuan. With 23.2 million inhabitants, Taiwan is among the most densely populated countries in the world.

Taiwan has been settled for at least 25,000 years. Ancestors of Taiwanese indigenous peoples settled the island around 6,000 years ago. In the 17th century, large-scale Han Chinese immigration to western Taiwan began under a Dutch colony and continued under the Kingdom of Tungning. The island was annexed in 1683 by the Qing dynasty of China, and ceded to the Empire of Japan in 1895. The Republic of China, which had overthrown the Qing in 1911, took control of Taiwan on behalf of the Allies of World War II following the surrender of Japan in 1945. The resumption of the Chinese Civil War resulted in the ROC’s loss of mainland China to forces of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and consequent retreat to Taiwan in 1949. Its effective jurisdiction has since been limited to Taiwan and smaller islands.

In the early 1960s, Taiwan entered a period of rapid economic growth and industrialisation called the “Taiwan Miracle”. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the ROC transitioned from a one-party military dictatorship to a multi-party democracy with a semi-presidential system. Taiwan’s export-oriented industrial economy is the 21st-largest in the world by nominal GDP and 20th-largest by PPP measures, with a focus on steel, machinery, electronics and chemicals manufacturing. Taiwan is a developed country, ranking 20th on GDP per capita. It is ranked highly in terms of civil liberties and healthcare, and human development.

The political status of Taiwan is contentious. The ROC no longer represents China as a member of the United Nations, after UN members voted in 1971 to recognize the PRC instead. The ROC maintained its claim of being the sole legitimate representative of China and its territory, although this has been downplayed since its democratization in the 1990s. Taiwan is claimed by the PRC, which refuses diplomatic relations with countries that recognise the ROC. Taiwan maintains official diplomatic relations with 13 out of 193 UN member states and the Holy See, though many others maintain unofficial diplomatic ties through representative offices and institutions that function as de facto embassies and consulates. International organisations in which the PRC participates either refuse to grant membership to Taiwan or allow it to participate only on a non-state basis under various names. Domestically, the major political contention is between parties favouring eventual Chinese unification and promoting a pan-Chinese identity, contrasted with those aspiring to formal international recognition and promoting a Taiwanese identity; into the 21st century, both sides have moderated their positions to broaden their appeal.

 

Therapist near me in Taiwan

Once you’ve found a therapist near you in Taiwan these are the questions to ask:

  • What are your fees?
  • Do you accept my insurance? (Have your insurance card handy)
  • What do your credentials mean for me?
  • Do you have experience working with people who have concerns like mine?
  • How do you approach helping people?
  • Do you make treatment plans? If so, will you share mine with me?
  • How do the sessions work with you? (How long is each appointment? What will we do?)
  • How long might I be working with you? (How many sessions do people have with you?)

 

If you have a positive conversation, feel that the therapist is open and easy to talk to, and the rates are affordable for you, it’s time to make your first appointment.

Online therapist in Taiwan

Some people prefer to use a virtual therapist in Taiwan and Teletherapy can be conducted over phone call, text, or video chat, depending on the client’s preference and the therapist’s technological capabilities. In many cases, online therapy in Taiwan provides the same quality of care. Several studies have found that teletherapy is just as effective as in-person sessions for treating a range of mental health disorders, including anxiety and depression. However, it does make it harder for the therapist to interpret nonverbal cues so video chat provides the closest feeling to actually being in the therapist’s office.

 

You may find that virtual therapy is not right for you based on your individual circumstances. Whether you have a severe mental health disorder that requires more intensive care, or you simply prefer to communicate in-person, online therapy is not always the best option.

 

The REMEDY wellbeing Intensive Outpatient Program can be delivered via teletherapy directly with our team in our Marbella HQ.

Citations: Therapist in Taiwan

  1. Blackburn I.M., James I.A., Milne D.L., Reichelt F.K. The revised cognitive therapy scale (CTSR): psychometric properties. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. 2001;29:431–447. []
  2. Cucciare M.A., Weingardt K.R., Villafranca S. Using blended learning to implement evidence-based psychotherapies. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 2008;15:299–307. []
  3. Herschell A.D., Kolko D.J., Baumann B.L., Davis A.C. The role of therapist training in the implementation of psychosocial treatments: a review and critique with recommendations of therapist in Taiwan. Clinical Psychology Review. 2010;30:448–466. []
  4. Perepletchikova F., Kazdin A.E. Treatment integrity and therapeutic change: issues and research recommendations. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 2005;12:365–383. []
  5. Sharpless B., Barber J. A conceptual and empirical review of the meaning, measurement, development, and teaching of intervention competence in clinical psychology. Clinical Psychology Review. 2009;29:47–56. [PMC free article]
  6. Waltz J., Addis M., Koerner K., Jacobson N. Testing the integrity of a psychotherapy protocol: assessment of adherence and competence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1993;61:620–630. []
Therapy in Taiwan

Therapy in Taiwan

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Massage, Meditation Centers, Sex Therapists
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Other treatment options in Taiwan for Anxiety, Depression and Addiction

Alcohol Addiction Treatment in Taiwan

Anxiety Treatment in Taiwan

Depression Treatment in Taiwan

Drug Addiction Treatment in Taiwan

http://marbella.rehab/Dual-Diagnosis-Treatment-in-Taiwan/

Gambling Addiction Treatment in Taiwan

http://marbella.rehab/Prescription-Medication-Addiction-Treatment-in-Taiwan/

Rehab in Taiwan

http://marbella.rehab/Sex-Addiction-Treatment-in-Taiwan/

Marbella Rehab

Summary
Therapist in Taiwan
Service Type
Therapist in Taiwan
Provider Name
REMEDY wellbeing IOP in Taiwan,
Taiwan,Taiwan,Taiwan-Taiwan,
Telephone No.+44(0)3333 03418
Area
Taiwan
Description
This article contains some helpful tips for finding a therapist in Taiwan. It can be very difficult to find the Right therapist in Taiwan. With so many to choose from, each with their own advantages and disadvantages how do you even begin to find a therapist in Taiwan that you’re comfortable with, and who you feel can help change your life for the better.